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Matt Story – Water

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Hyperrealist oil painting of woman floating underwater by Matt Story

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A selection of new paintings by Matt Story.

“I try to paint contemporary life as to capture crystals of pristine memory that we all share but never describe to one another. Each composition uses the gesture of figure or setting to evoke a platonic form, an archetypal notion, a distilled essence, that thing that lasts beyond the moment.” – Matt Story


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Dirk Braeckman – Photographs

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A selection of recent photographs from Dirk Braeckman.

An excerpt from the artist’s website:

When we see photographs by the Belgian artist Dirk Braeckman installed in museums, we seem to be looking at photographs that aspire to the condition of painting. They are large — he likes them to be life-size. They are unglazed— he wants no interruption to the eye. They demand as slow an act of looking as any painting.


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Cara Barer – Photographed Book Sculptures

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A selection of recent photographed book sculptures by Cara Barer.

A statement from Cara Barer about these works:

I transform books into art by sculpting them, dyeing them and then through the medium of photography presenting them anew as objects of beauty. I create a record of that book and its half-life.

Books, physical objects and repositories of information, are being displaced by zeros and ones in a digital universe with no physicality. Through my art, I document this and raise questions about the fragile and ephemeral nature of books and their future.

I arrive at some of my images by chance and others through experimentation. Without these two elements, my work would not flow easily from one idea to the next. A random encounter on Drew Street with a Houston Yellow Pages was the primary inspiration for me. After that chance meeting, I began to search for more books, and more ways to recreate them.

I realized I owned many books that were no longer of use to me, or for that matter, anyone else. Would I ever need a “Windows 95 Manual”? After soaking it in the bathtub for a few hours, it had a new shape and purpose. Half-Price Books became a regular haunt, and an abandoned house yielded a set of outdated reference books, complete with mold and neglect. Each book tells me how to begin according to its size, type of paper and sometimes contents.

As I begin the process, I first consider the contents of each volume. I only spent a few seconds on the “Windows 95 Manual”. The “New Century Dictionary of the English Language,” was a treasure. Its fascinating illustrations and archaic examples saved it from taking on a new form.

This transformation and photographic documentation led to thoughts on obsolescence and the relevance of libraries in this century. Half a century ago, students researched at home with the family set of encyclopedias, or took a trip to the library to locate information. Now, with computers, tablets and/or smartphones, an Internet connection and cloud storage, a student has the ability to amass knowledge and complete a research paper without ever going near a library. I have fully embraced all this technology, and would not want to be without it, but fear the loss of the beautiful record of books common over the last two centuries.


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Dimitri Kozyrev – Recent Paintings

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A selection of recent paintings by Dimitri Kozyrev.

Here is a statement from the artist.

My interest in the intersection between actual, physical landscape and mental landscapes, coupled with recent world events, led me to reflect on the ruins of war and the human impact wars leave behind on landscape. In my recent work, modernist, constructivist methods of rearranging pictorial space are used to reflect on the scars that wars have left behind, mentally and physically, but also the way that landscape and nature heal these scars and how the events and people who created them become forgotten. I have titled this body of work “Lost Edge.” I use the word “edge” because I draw a comparison between the notion of the avant-garde in war and the art world. In the early 20th Century, the avant-garde was at the height of its importance in both realms. Now, however, I maintain that just as the concept of the military avant-garde has been “lost,” because of changes in methods of warfare, the avant-garde in the contemporary art world, has also lost its edge.

The source material for this body of work is images of ruins of the once mighty fortifications of the Mannerhiem Line, built to protect Finland from the advances of the Soviet military avant-garde. Finland’s attempt was valiant and not in vain; this war and the lives that were lost in 1939 are largely forgotten. The fortification lie in ruins, and nature is slowly reclaiming them. Similarly, the “cutting edge” of the contemporary art world seems to have become blunted. Viewers of the avant-garde work of many visionary artists of the early 20th Century were shocked, challenged and inspired by The Malevich’s “Black Square” and “Fountain” of Marcel Duchamp. Because of changes in society, like changes in warfare, it has become difficult for today’s contemporary artist to generate the same level of response without resorting to vulgarity.


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James Ostrer – Wotsit All About?

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As part of the Window Project, Gazelli Art House will present the commissioned photographic works by National Portrait Gallery Curator’s Choice, artist James Ostrer, from the 30th July 2014. The images, referencing icons of contemporary sugar worship, Ostrer’s imagined result of a corrupted globalization and increasingly dangerous methods of food production, will occupy the glass facade of the gallery and spread over the ground floor. A glimpse into a post apocolyptic world which has been destroyed by mass production, we are encouraged to question the decisions that are made for us:

Wotsit all about?

James Ostrer’s (England, 1979) photographs of sugar adorned subjects allude to the history of primitive art, synthetic dietary sugar intake, and an irreverent twist on the absurd in which societal practices of ingestion oscillate into a nightmarish world of abject effrontery and nutritional disillusionment. The works are feverishly and painstakingly created tableaus with layers of sweets and foodstuffs being applied to a human subject, often the artist himself, which, when staged, are photographed and patterned for re-consumption through the distribution of photographic practice. Speaking largely on the twentieth and twenty first centuries’ dietary concerns and sugar’s uncomfortable place within this, Ostrer’s photographs conjure metaphorical allegories as Ketchup flows as tears down frosted cheeks and Kit Kats’ mouths bark back with menacing grimaces. This adornment becomes a mask of what we eat which then becomes entwined with a hyper-pop sensibility and an obsequious inquiry into the great volumes of sugar that flow through our bodies.

Much like Paul McCarthy’s or George Condo’s seminal works, the photographs form a bizarre pattern of tribalism and cartoon-like absurdity. They are rife with a sense of ritual endeavour and colour-saturated sensitivity; a palpitating nostalgia for the sweets we are presented with and the potential havoc they wreak within our collective bodies.


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Van Wanten Etcetera – The Amsterdam Chainsaw Bicycle

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Van Wanten Etcetera – The Amsterdam Chainsaw Bicycle

You never saw it coming. The terror of the Amsterdam streets. The Amsterdam Chainsaw Bicycle. A promotion for the Imagine Film Festival Amsterdam. A festival where horror, fantasy, sci-fi, action and thrillers are shown. We’ve created this minimal budget campaign to promote this amazing festival. By making a hommagefilm to the classic horror movies with an Amsterdam twist.


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Raging Bull – Musem of Modern Art

Raging Bull - Musem of Modern Art

See Scorsese’s Raging Bull on the big screen this Wednesday through Friday at MoMA in NYC.

[Raging Bull. 1980. USA. Directed by Martin Scorsese]


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Sophie Smallhorn – New Works

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New works from Sophie Smallhorn.

Sophie Smallhorn was born in 1971 and is an artist and consultant. She exhibits internationally and is commissioned by both private and corporate clients. Her work explores the relationships between colour, volume and proportion. Sophie currently lives and works in London.


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Nicola Verlato – Paintings

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Nicola Verlato was born in Verona, Italy on the 19th of February 1965. He started to paint about the age of 7, and to sell his paintings about 9. His artistic education has been quite unorthodox, he considers himself almost self taught, however, from 9 to 14, he spent every summer at the studio of a monk-painter ( Fra’ Terenzio) in the monastery nearby his village in northeast Italy, he consider that the place where he learned how to drawing in the academic style.

His first serious show was at the age of 15 in the town hall of Lonigo, a 3 person show in collaboration with other 2 artists of the area. Nicola has been also trained in classical music from the age of 9 (classic guitar, Lute, piano and composition) at the conservatory in Verona, later, he drove his attention toward rock music playing electric guitar, bass, sinths, composing song, jingles and soundtracks for documentaries. He also studied architecture at the university of Venice where he lived for almost 13 years painting portraits and allegorical scenes for the local aristocracy and the affluent foreigners living in that city. During this period in Venice he worked on almost everything that was connected with drawing: stage design, temporary decorations, illustrations, comics, storyboard etc. Around 28 he started to be interested in contemporary art, and, consequentially, to show in numerous gallery in Italy and abroad in solo and group shows.

After spending 7 years in Milan, where he created his well grounded notoriety in Italy, in 2004 decided to move to NY city. In these last years he showed principally in NY city and in various galleries and museum around the States, Italy and Norway, but also in India as well as Germany, Holland and other European countries. His major achievement has been his participation with an installation of paintings and sculptures as a representative of the Italian Pavilion at the 2009 Venice Biennale. Since 2011 Nicola Verlato lives and works in Los Angeles.


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Mark Hollis – Blow Struck

Mark Hollis - Blow Struck

Mark HollisBlow Struck (2013)

Via: Like a Field Mouse


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